DRONES COMING CLOSE

Drones are lately sparking more than just a privacy debate, as they enter restricted airspace and potentially physically endanger passengers flying in and out of airports like JFK and LaGuardia.  Photo courtesy of infowars.com

Drones are lately sparking more than just a privacy debate, as they enter restricted airspace and potentially physically endanger passengers flying in and out of airports like JFK and LaGuardia. Photo courtesy of infowars.com

Three recent incidents of drone-spotting near JFK airport have prompted U.S. Senator Chuck Schumer to revisit the issue he addressed just a few months ago, this time with an even greater emphasis on physical safety.   Schumer urged the Federal Aviation Administration and the Office of Management and Budget this week to expedite its release of new drone regulations.

In August, the Senator pushed the Commerce Department’s National Telecommunications and Information Administration to develop guidelines focused on best practices for drone usage and data collection and storage.

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Army wants to build special drone airstrip

Shadow UAV supports 24 hour operations

The Army wants to build a new airfield at the Yakima Training Center for soldiers to train with an unmanned aircraft system.

Soldiers already train with the Shadow, a small reconnaissance drone, at a shared runway at the Selah Airstrip several miles southwest of the center.

Manned aviation training has priority at the Selah airfield, and traffic is increasing, according to Army Corps of Engineers environmental assessment draft documents.

A new airfield with a parking lot, the Army says, will mean more training opportunities and, ultimately, better scouting for forces in combat.

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Altavian Inc., Lockheed Martin providing sensor payload to Army Read more: http://www.upi.com/Business_News/Security-Industry/2014/11/13/Altavian-Inc-Lockheed-Martin-providing-sensor-payload-to-Army/4231415912521/#ixzz3J2ioe3hD

A new electro-optic sensor payload from Altavian Inc. and Lockheed Martin for RQ-20 Puma unmanned aerial systems has been ordered by the U.S. Army.

The hand-launched RQ-20 Puma will now carry a new electro-optic gimbaled sensor payload. (AeroVironment)

A new gimbaled imaging sensor jointly developed by Altavian Inc. and Lockheed Martin will be used on the U.S. Army’s Puma small unmanned aerial system.

Provision of the gimbaled electro-optical imaging sensor, which provides advanced stabilization, sharper images, dual-band imaging and laser illumination capabilities comes under a $4 million award to Altavian, Lockheed Martin reported.

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One code to rule them all: Dronecode

drone with gopro digital camera mounted underneath   22 april 2013
Credit: Don McCullough/Wikimedia Commons (CC BY 2.0)

The Dronecode Project will unite thousands of coders to build an aerial operating system for drones

Drones have just found their new best friends: coders. On Oct. 13, the Linux Foundation unveiled a nonprofit organization called the Dronecode Project, an open-source development initiative uniting thousands of coders for the purpose of building an aerial operating system for drones. Hopeful that the project will bring order to the chaos that has surrounded software developers as they sprint to carve out a share of the bourgeoning market for unmanned aircraft systems (UAS), UAS operators are now asking whether Dronecode will finally provide the horsepower and industry-wide support needed to launch a universal drone operating system.

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New FAA TFR prohibits model aircraft/RPAS flight within 3nm of large sporting events

FAA-Puma1

Watch out if you are tempted to look over the wall at the ball game. The FAA have issued a NOTAM that no doubt event operators will enforce on their behalf. It brings model aircraft and RPAS within a NOTAM previously enacted post 9/11 for full sized aircraft.

What does it mean, if your flying field is within 3nm of major sporting events you should not be flying one hour before to one hour after an event is happening.

That strikes me as a little bit arbitrary for model aircraft a limit of half a mile would more than cover it. I suspect that TV rights at sports events has more to do with this than safety.

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Drones Help Show How Infectious Diseases Spread

Unmanned aerial vehicles, or drones, can collect detailed information in real time at relatively low cost for ecological research.

In a new Opinion piece published in the Cell Press journal Trends in Parasitology, experts demonstrate that drones can be used to understand how environmental factors influence the spread of infectious diseases.

This is a 3D image of the researchers' study site in Malaysian Borneo using drone data and a photo of the Sensefly eBee drone up close. Image credit: Trends in Parasitology, Fornace et al.This is a 3D image of the researchers’ study site in Malaysian Borneo using drone data and a photo of the Sensefly eBee drone up close. Image credit: Trends in Parasitology, Fornace et al.

“Drones can provide highly accurate information on changes to land, such as deforestation or changing types of agriculture. This helps to understand the impact on the movement and distribution of people, animals, and insects that carry disease,” says lead author Kimberly Fornace, of the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, in the UK.

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Aerospace Student Pilots Unmanned Planes With Eye Toward Future

Mark Palframan, center, works on and is primary pilot of the E-SPAARO unmanned plane, part of the Virginia Tech’s Nonlinear Systems Lab. Flanking him are John Coggin (left), a senior research associate at Virginia Tech’s Institute for Critical Technology and Applied Science, and (right) engineering doctoral student Chris Kevorkian.

Mark Palframan, center, works on and is primary pilot of the E-SPAARO unmanned plane, part of the Virginia Tech’s Nonlinear Systems Lab. Flanking him are John Coggin (left), a senior research associate at Virginia Tech’s Institute for Critical Technology and Applied Science, and (right) engineering doctoral student Chris Kevorkian.

– See more at: http://theroanokestar.com/2014/10/07/aerospace-student-pilots-unmanned-planes-with-eye-toward-future/#sthash.zlc9u4uQ.dpufWhen Mark Palframan sets to work, he’s at Virginia Tech’s Kentland Research Farm. No dirt is involved, though. His hands are on a souped-up remote control device, and his eyes look to the air, set sharp on the unmanned E-SPAARO aircraft as it soars 400 hundred feet above the ground. The Electric-SPAARO — short for Small Platform for Autonomous Aerial Research Operations — is a small unmanned aerial system operated by Virginia Tech’s Nonlinear Systems Lab that can fly either autonomously or by remote control.

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