Farmers need to stick to drone rules

Drones can be useful in farming, but breaking the rules comes with costs.

Kaycie O’Connor

Drones can be useful in farming, but breaking the rules comes with costs.

by SARAH MCKENZIE

OPINION: There has been recent publicity about the use of drones by farmers to help survey stock and check crops.

Beef + Lamb New Zealand have even funded investigations into applying drones for farming.

On one hill country sheep, beef and cropping farm the use of a drone has proven beneficial in monitoring stock during lambing as well as mapping drains, counting stock, monitoring weeds and monitoring water trough levels.

Along with a huge growth in the development and use of drones has come law changes.

The changes came as a result of concerns raised regarding the dangers for people and property below and also possible breaches of privacy.

The law changes are especially important if you are intending to take photos or videos.

Parts 101 and 102 of the Civil Aviation Rules apply to the operation of drones.

Part 101 governs the operation of drones that are less than 25 kilograms, will be operated at less than 400 feet (nearly 122 metres) and fully comply with the other rules set out in that part.

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