Unmanned devices changing everything from war to agriculture

Alexis Roze, of the non-profit Drone Adventures, shows an eBee mapping "drone" to local kids in the Philippines. The small device was used in the wake of Typhoon Yolanda to help the hard-hit community of Tacloban quickly generate a precise map to be used in disaster relief efforts.

COURTESY DRONE ADVENTURES

Alexis Roze, of the non-profit Drone Adventures, shows an eBee mapping “drone” to local kids in the Philippines. The small device was used in the wake of Typhoon Yolanda to help the hard-hit community of Tacloban quickly generate a precise map to be used in disaster relief efforts.

In 2015, a miner somewhere in Chile will likely say a quiet gracias to a Canadian man he has never met.

He’ll be thankful because he will no longer be called upon to manually dislodge a “hang-up” — an unstable cluster of boulders wedged overhead. Such bottlenecks are common and can significantly reduce a mine’s output. But clearing them is a dirty, dangerous job that carries the very real risk of death.

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