Lisa Raitt, minister of transport, issues new drone safety guidelines

Article from Transport Canada

The Honourable Lisa Raitt, Minister of Transport, today launched the Government of Canada’s safety awareness campaign for unmanned air vehicles (UAVs), or drones. The national campaign will help ensure UAV users—both recreational and commercial—understand the rules of the skies and always think safety first.

The first phase of the campaign, unveiled today, provides the public with new safety guidelines and an easy to follow infographic that clarifies when to apply for Transport Canada permission to fly their UAV. This winter, the second phase of the campaign will include search engine and social media advertising, awareness videos and a simpler process to apply for permission to fly. Transport Canada has also launched tc.gc.ca/SafetyFirst, which provides Canadians with the information and advice they need to fly their UAV safely and legally.

The safety guidelines introduced today complement the existing requirements and will help ensure Canadians understand the risks and responsibilities of operating an unmanned aircraft. In addition to respecting the Canadian Aviation Regulations, UAV operators must follow the rules in all acts and regulations, including the Criminal Code as well as all municipal, provincial, and territorial laws regarding trespassing and privacy.

Source Article

Solutions in Search of Problems: Spectroscopy Takes Flight

Figure 1: Microspectrometers mounted to an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) are deployed at altitudes of up to 200 m for reflectance measurements of ground cover and vegetation. Images: Ocean OpticsFigure 1: Microspectrometers mounted to an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) are deployed at altitudes of up to 200 m for reflectance measurements of ground cover and vegetation. Images: Ocean Optics

Spectral sensing is so pervasive that most take it for granted. Even miniature spectrometers—at one time an almost subversive technology—have been embraced by late adopters. Yet, spectroscopy has moved beyond routine laboratory and test measurements to take on ever-more sophisticated applications—from monitoring patient vital signs at bedside to identifying suspicious materials on the battlefield. In this article we explore how familiar spectral sensing technologies—and new ways to exploit them—are today addressing a wider range of measurement problems than ever. From adding wireless capabilities to spectrometers to reducing their footprint to the size of a matchbox, manufacturers have provided developers with powerful new tools to inspire innovative solutions for a variety of unmet application needs.

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Manchester Police arrest man for flying drone over City vs Spurs match

Photo credit: Greater Manchester PoliceThink drones only happen in Serbia? Think again.

A 41-year-old man from Nottinham was arrested in the parking lot of an Adsa supermarket today on suspicion of flying a drone over this weekend’s 4-1 Manchester City win against Tottenham Hotspur.

There were over 45,000 fans at the match.

According to the Greater Manchester Police, the man posted bail for eight weeks while the department investigates further. The police released a photograph of the captured drone (pictured, right).

The police released a statement from Chief Inspector Chris Hill, in charge of security for the match, who said:

“The drones could pose a threat to crowd safety and potentially cause alarm in crowded areas. Even small drones can weigh up to seven or eight kilograms and could cause damage or injury if they fall from height. Thankfully, no one was hurt. People may see this as a minor offence but it is a breach of the Air Navigation Order which is prosecuted by the civil aviation authority.”

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Mite of hexacopter aids farmers

PEST MANAGEMENT: Nathan Roy and Glenn Bennett trial the Aerobug hexacopter at Strawberry Fields in Stanthorpe.PEST MANAGEMENT: Nathan Roy and Glenn Bennett trial the Aerobug hexacopter at Strawberry Fields in Stanthorpe.Emma BoughenA NEED to find another way led Strawberry Fields manager Brendan Hoyle to invite a ‘hexacopter’ to fly over his Stanthorpe strawberry patch dropping predatory mites onto the plants below.

“Once we saw the trials and data start coming out of their Sunshine Coast season we thought we’d try it for ourselves to see if there’s a place for it at Strawberry Fields,” Mr Hoyle said.

Predatory mites have been a part of growers’ Integrated Pest Management (IPM) tool belt for roughly two decades as they eat the larvae of pests such as the two-spotted mite in place of traditional chemical sprays.

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